Guitar Retrospective #7 (Pt. 2): “Koi Flower”

As I mentioned in the first installment of this project, this guitar fell victim to the stand it was displayed on. Just when you thought it was safe right!? And frankly, I didn’t do a very good job on the first attempt, so having the sides of the guitar completely melted down to the wood where the guitar rested proved to be an excellent excuse to give this guitar a facelift and correct some things that went wrong the first time.

Where the stand melted the finish.

Where the stand melted the finish.

Close up of damaged area.

Close up of damaged area.

Damaged area and horrendous sand thrus.

Damaged area and horrendous sand thrus.

The pictures above show the damaged areas and the sand thrus along the edges. All of this needed addressed, so I busted out the random orbital sander with some 60 grit and went to work taking it back down to the paint/fabric level. Once I got close I switched to a higher grit so I wouldn’t rip through the fabric completely. If I wore into lightly it was no big deal, that could be built back up with no issues. You can see below the faint areas behind the pickups, that’s a good example of sanding into the fabric. That happened to be where the bridge was gonna sit anyway. But I still wouldn’t consider it an issue, creates kind of a cool accent to the look.

Sanded back down to fabric.

Sanded back down to fabric.

Sanded down to fabric on back.

Sanded down on back and sides.

Masking template and paint.

Masking template and paint.

At this point I was ready to move forward again being extra careful with each step of the process, especially with making sure I built the sanding sealer coats up enough to fully cover everything. There was one spot on the front where an air bubble had developed (from not using enough glue in the beginning), which I addressed specifically by cutting the fabric, applying some super glue in the bubble, and flattening. With sanding sealer coats and sanding that area down repeatedly, I was able to completely flatten that spot out and remove the bubble. Can’t even find that spot now. Once a solid foundation was established again, I could repaint the sides and burst. I was able to get the same paint as before, so I could get the same look as before which I was very happy with, as I had matching pick guard, pick up covers, and knobs.

Using the cardboard template to paint sides and a burst.

Using the cardboard template to paint sides and a burst.

I still had the body template I had made the first time for painting. This is a great simple tool to make as you begin the process. I make one for every guitar I do. Since I just do one-offs I use spray cans and a cardboard cut out of the guitar body I’m working on, which I just trace at the beginning when I have the guitar in pieces. It can be manipulated for curves in the body, like the bottom left corner of the pic on the left, where it’s just bent over to follow the curve of the body to keep the spray uniform. I start by placing the template flat on the body to get the sides painted, shooting at a downward angle so most of the paint hits the sides and doesn’t sneak underneath. Then to do a burst, where the paint fades into the body from the edges, you can place items between the template and the body in the middle to give it a little lift (like shown), and spray at various downward angles while moving the template around as necessary. It masks the body while leaving the edge open enough to get a nice natural fade. It takes some practice and going a little at a time and checking often to see where it needs more paint. But you can get a very nice looking burst with this method with some practice just using spray cans!

Paint complete. Burst on front.

Paint complete. Burst on front.

Paint complete. Burst on back.

Paint complete. Burst on back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I finish the paint process by very lightly sanding the faces of the guitar to remove any paint dust that may have settled in the burst process. Usually just a rough rag will suffice. And always wipe down with naphtha after each step to remove dust and finger oils! There was also the headstock component to this which I apparently didn’t get pictures of along the way the second time through. The finish had sunken a little revealing the outline of the decal, and it was just a little rough overall. I gave that the full treatment as well, minus the paint, while I did the same steps as the body. So after a long and slow process of applying clear coats, sanding down (the clear was going on quite rough and orange-peely), more clear coats, letting it cure, and then the final wet sand and polish, and not encountering a SINGLE sand thru, which was cause for much celebration!, I could call this guitar fully restored and complete. I waited for a sunny day and got some final pictures. So here you have it, in all its glory. 🙂

j.

 

Koi 2 - Front 1 Koi 2 - Front 2 Koi 2 - Back 1Koi 2 - Front 3 Koi 2 - Back 2Koi 2 - Horns Koi 2 - HeadstockKoi 2 - Front Full Koi 2 - Back Full

Me and the Koi-caster.

Me and the Koi-caster.

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